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Archive for the tag “sleep”

Get lost Tooth Fairy

Teething isn’t the most fun experience for children or parents. Most people, whether they have kids or not, know this. But, what nobody told me was that once teething starts, IT DOESN’T STOP. Okay, maybe I’m being a little dramatic but my daughter has cut five teeth in the last two months, and four of those were molars. So please forgive me.

To the childless, or those who have children that haven’t started teething yet, it’s hard to comprehend what this mean. Think, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

My child is generally very well natured and is happy to play on her own. But when she’s getting a tooth, watch out! She’s crying one minute, giggling the next, giving me kisses and then pushing me away—and all four of these actions happen within a three minute time span. She wants to be picked up, she wants down, she want up, she wants down.

And what’s worse, I have NO IDEA what sets any of these things off. It’s like some evil tooth fairy came and sprinkled cranky dust all over her.

Oh and sleeping, forget it. We had finally got to a stage where she was sleeping through the night consistently. Just as we were all getting comfortable with this new-found habit, BANG, along comes molar number one and we’re back to getting up at least once a night.

Is this nature’s way of preparing parents for when their kids are teenagers?

Annnddddd, rant over.

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My baby doesn’t sleep either

It’s been a while, I know. I’ve been a bit busy, a bit tired and just a bit lazy. But I’m back. I’ve been inspired by a blog post a girlfriend sent me today: Sleep Training – A baby’s view.  She swears it was written by our two babies, I think she’s right. I was laughing so hard I almost cried. (I’ve  included the post in italics below)

When you’re pregnant people tell you that most babies start to sleep through the night around three  months. Few people tell you how it really is. Out of the nine babies in my circle of friends–ranging in ages from six to 11 months–only three of them sleep through the night consistently. I’m no mathematician but even I know that certainly isn’t most.

I’ve tried several sleep training methods, I’ve tried letting it ride. I’ve tried different bedtime routines. I’ve tried just about everything. On a good night my dear daughter will sleep for eight hours straight, wake up for a bottle and go back to sleep for four more hours. On a not-so-good night, she’s up every four hours and won’t go back to sleep without being fed. I should add that those “good nights” come around on a monthly basis.

When things get really bad, I start back with the strict sleep training. Things are good for a few days but then they slowly slide.

I’ve decided that while I can encourage her to sleep better, I can’t really teach her. She’s got to figure it out on her own.  According to the all the books, I’m doing everything right. So why does it still feel like I’m doing something wrong?

Sleep Training – A Baby’s View

OK, here’s my situation. My Mommy has had me for almost 7 months. The first few months were great–I cried, she picked me up and fed me, anytime, day or night. Then something happened. Over the last few weeks, she has been trying to STTN (sleep thru the night). At first, I thought it was just a phase, but it is only getting worse. I’ve talked to other babies, and it seems like it’s pretty common after Mommies have had us for around 6 months. Here’s the thing: these Mommies don’t really need to sleep. It’s just a habit. Many of them have had some 30 years to sleep–they just don’t need it anymore. So I am implementing a plan. I call it the Crybaby Shuffle.

It goes like this:

Night 1–cry every 3 hours until you get fed. I know, it’s hard. It’s hard to see your Mommy upset over your crying. Just keep reminding yourself, it’s for her own good.

Night 2–cry every 2 hours until you get fed.

Night 3–every hour.

Most Mommies will start to respond more quickly after about 3 nights.

Some Mommies are more alert, and may resist the change longer. These Mommies may stand in your doorway for hours, shhhh-ing. Don’t give in. I cannot stress this enough: CONSISTENCY IS KEY!! If you let her STTN (sleep through the night), just once, she will expect it every night. I KNOW IT’S HARD! But she really does not need the sleep, she is just resisting the change. If you have an especially alert Mommy, you can stop crying for about 10 minutes, just long enough for her to go back to bed and start to fall asleep. Then cry again. It WILL eventually work. My Mommy once stayed awake for 10 hours straight, so I know she can do it.

Last night, I cried every hour. You just have to decide to stick to it and just go for it. BE CONSISTENT! I cried for any reason I could come up with. My sleep sack tickled my foot. I felt a wrinkle under the sheet. My mobile made a shadow on the wall. I burped, and it tasted like pears. I hadn’t eaten pears since lunch, what’s up with that? The cat said “meow”. I should know. My Mommy reminds me of this about 20 times a day. LOL. Once I cried just because I liked how it sounded when it echoed on the monitor in the other room. Too hot, too cold, just right–doesn’t matter! Keep crying!! It took awhile, but it worked. She fed me at 4am. Tomorrow night, my goal is 3:30am. You need to slowly shorten the interval between feedings in order to reset your Mommies’ internal clocks.

P.S. Don’t let those rubber things fool you, no matter how long you suck on them, no milk will come out. Trust me.

It’s because I’m awesome

Prior to mommyhood, I never gave sleep a second thought. I never really needed a whole lot. Even as a teenager I wasn’t one to sleep in until all hours of the day on a regular basis. But now, I realize just what a precious thing sleep is.

At six months old my little darling still is not sleeping through the night. She’ll give me three and half to five hours of sleep in a row but that’s about it, and even that isn’t on a regular basis. Sleep has been the topic of many conversations at my play dates and mommy groups and everyone seems to have a different opinion of what it is that gets a child to sleep through the night.

“They’ll do it when they are ready,” say some. “They need to learn to self sooth,” say others. Pick them up, don’t pick them up,  let them cry, don’t let them cry, don’t rock, do swaddle –anyone who’s ever had a baby seems to have a book about how to put your kid to sleep. (And I feel like I’ve read them all.)

What I’ve learned is, each of these “proven” techniques don’t work on every baby and it’s also not my fault she isn’t sleeping. I’ve come to the conclusion that yes, I can help her  by making sure she’s fed, is dry, and has the right environment but I can’t actually make her stay asleep. That part is up to her.

Some parents are lucky and their kids seem to figure it out early on. Other parents have to go a while longer before they are getting a full night of shut eye. If you’re in my camp, I just drum it up to the fact that my kid loves me so much she just wants to hang out with me all night long. I guess I’m just that awesome. 🙂

Sleep Interrupted

I’ve been a bit MIA lately, I have no other excuse other than I’ve been tired. I found this little cartoon that explains it perfectly.

My four month old baby has reverted to her newborn sleeping habits — up every two to three hours in the night wanting to eat. Gone are the days when she went four and five hours between feedings. She also doesn’t nap for longer than 30 minutes during the day. She might take three cat naps, if I am lucky. We’re working on adjusting her bedtime routine and getting into a better nap routine but so far, no luck.

She gave me a little tease about a week ago and slept for five hours, but it seems that was only due to her vaccines.

I knew when I got pregnant that uninterrupted sleep would soon be a thing of the past, I just wish someone would have told me sleep during pregnancy is really training for motherhood. I may have been better prepared. All those nights I had to get up two and three times to run to the washroom, now I’m doing the same thing but running to a different room.

I also wish that someone would have mentioned how I would lose patience for people who choose to stay up all night and then complain about the lack of sleep they get. What I wouldn’t give to “only” get six hours of sleep in a row. Yes, I know, I chose to have a baby and therefore have to take the good with the not so awesome but still, its hard not to be slightly envious of those who get the opportunity to sleep uninterrupted. (Okay, rant over.)

I know this will pass but the light at the end of this tunnel is dim right now.

 

 

 

The What If Monster

What if she’s not healthy? What if she stops breathing? What if I forgot to do up the buckle? What if I forget her in the car when I get to the store?

I had no idea I would become so paranoid when I got pregnant, and I surely didn’t think it would be possible for that  paranoia to increase once the baby came.

When I was pregnant I was much better at reining in these roaming thoughts. “You’re healthy, there have been no issues and there is nothing more you can do, what will happen will happen.” That was the mantra that brought me back to reality when the what ifs started. Now I practically have to slap myself to keep my mind from wandering too far down What If lane.

When we first moved the baby from the bassinet in our room to her own room I had the monitor up full blast and the video function on all night. This completely defeated the purpose of moving her. I got more sleep when she was grunting and farting a foot from my bed! Her room is next to ours and I can hear her as clear as day without the monitor but I insisted on sleeping with it one foot from my head.

In the month she’s been in her own room, I’ve since turn the volume down but I still sleep with the video on.

However, I still can’t go to sleep if checking on her isn’t the last thing I do before I got to bed. I’ve tried checking on her before I start my bedtime primping but it always ends with me laying in bed, looking at the monitor and making my husband hold his breath so I can hear her breath. “Shhhh, you’re breathing too loud! I can’t hear her.”  After a few minutes of straining to hear, I get up and check on her again. I’ve learned to pick my battles with the What If Monster and just make the bedtime sneak peak the last thing I do.

I’ve also pulled over while driving to check on her. It’s too quiet, what’s wrong? Admittedly, I only did this once but have resisted the urge more times than I can count.

I find it amazing that Dads don’t seem to have these issues? Why is this? Are they more rational than Moms?

There should be support groups for this stuff!

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